Progressive Web Apps versus Android Instant Apps: Which is better for marketers?

Much has been made of the fight between mobile apps and the mobile web , but the line between the two is no longer as clear-cut as it used to be. Broadly speaking, a mobile-friendly or mobile-responsive website is less costly and time-consuming to develop than a native mobile app, and tends to attract a wider audience – it’s quick to access, with no downloading or storage required.

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Progressive Web Apps versus Android Instant Apps: Which is better for marketers?

How to reduce the impact of images on your mobile site speed

Images are the main culprit for causing oversized web pages (average size 2.2MB) that can perform slowly on mobile devices. Last week, we looked at how to optimize your mobile site speed  and test for issues that might be slowing your site down. With Google placing more and more emphasis on mobile site speed and user experience in order to achieve a good ranking, discovering issues with your mobile site speed is critical

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How to reduce the impact of images on your mobile site speed

Accelerated Mobile Pages vs Facebook Instant Articles: Is Google winning the mobile war?

Articles published with Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) load four times faster than standard mobile pages with a 35% improvement in engagement time, according to new research from Chartbeat . Facebook Instant Articles (FIA), a key competitor to Google’s AMP product, load faster than AMP.

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Accelerated Mobile Pages vs Facebook Instant Articles: Is Google winning the mobile war?

How to optimize your mobile site speed: Testing for issues

The right picture is very useful on mobile and responsive websites. But images that are too large, too numerous and unnecessary simply slow down page load times and get in the way of the users reading and doing what they need to do. The problem: the size of webpages sent to mobile phones has quadrupled in just five years.

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How to optimize your mobile site speed: Testing for issues

Voice search: A digital space race

Voice search has been identified by the world’s leading technology providers as a huge opportunity to acquire market share over the next decade. It has become a hot topic in the industry, with every new hardware and software release being met with significant press coverage, and countless op-eds and articles analyzing the voice search ‘explosion’ taking place

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Voice search: A digital space race

Google I/O: What’s going on with Progressive Web Apps?

At Google’s developer jamboree, Google I/O, last week the search giant paraded a host of big name case studies and compelling stats to herald its success with two initiatives to make the mobile web better and faster: Progressive Web Apps (PWA) and Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) . Progressive Web Apps are a Google innovation designed to combine the best features of mobile apps and the mobile web: speed, app-like interaction, offline usage, and no need to download anything. Google spotlighted this relatively new web product at last year’s Google I/O, where the Washington Post showed off a newly-built Progressive Web App to enhance its mobile experience

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Google I/O: What’s going on with Progressive Web Apps?

How video impacts mobile web performance and UX, part 2: autoplay and audio

Mobile video is a major up-and-coming trend in content, with brands everywhere  converging on the new and lucrative mobile video market. Mark Zuckerberg said on a recent shareholder conference call  that he sees video as “a megatrend on the same order as mobile” – which makes mobile video, the intersection between the two, the ultimate sweet spot of engaging content to draw in new consumer eyeballs. But sadly, there are still some technical hurdles to overcome before the mobile video experience is as smooth as companies would like it to be

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How video impacts mobile web performance and UX, part 2: autoplay and audio

Should Google be more transparent with its updates?

It might seem hard to recall now, but there was a time when Google would regularly announce updates to its ranking algorithms, confirming what they were and how they would affect websites. During these halcyon days, information about Google ranking updates was generally delivered via Google engineer and head of Google’s Webspam Team Matt Cutts , who was to many marketers the public face of Google. As someone who was involved in helping to write the search algorithms himself, Matt Cutts was an authoritative voice about Google updates, and could be depended on to provide announcements about major algorithm changes.

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Should Google be more transparent with its updates?